Learned Jar Flower Arrangement

Moving means reorganizing, and today I had the wonderful task of designing two pretty decor pieces from some organic souvenirs of mine.

The wildflowers are from my trip to the prairie last fall, and the thorns are from the trunk of a locust tree from the same trip. I still have trouble believing how freaking huge they are—well, were; I had to cut them up to fit in the glass jars, which I bought from Walmart.

Before.

Before.

During. Picture credit: my stalking mother.

During. Picture credit: my stalking mother.

I decided to cut up the thorns and separate the flowers outside, and I'm very glad I did. The bouquet was pretty well meshed together and shed a lot of leaves. Soon it began drizzling, and I really didn't want the flowers to get wet, so I moved inside.

After.

After.

The jars are pictured closed here, but I'm actually leaving them open for a bit because the plants got a bit wet from the rain and I don't want them to mold.

I made the one on the left first and didn't quite like how it turned out. (But since it's a chore moving the delicate foliage around in there, I decided not to redo it.) So I tried to do things a differently with the second jar, and I realized some of my mistakes.

Here's what I learned about creating a beautiful arrangement:

  • Divide the foliage by type, so there are distinct sections.
  • Place the wider, fuller plant varieties closest to the glass to get a good view of their dimension.
  • Colorful flowers should also be placed on the outside, even if not very wide in stature. 
  • The inclusion of thorns looks best when kept to a minimum and placed in the center of the jar; the thorns act as a sort of aesthetic glue that way, pulling all the different sections together.
  • Any long and thin plant varieties should be placed in the center, to give it some upward dimension and again to act as "aesthetic glue."